The Ideal Seminarian

Eamonn Clark

With much discussion these days about seminary reform, here is a partial description of what the ideal seminarian is like…

He rises at 5 every morning, works and prays until midnight, and gets 8 hours of sleep.

He is in great physical health and has perfect hair, but he is not too concerned about his appearance.

He has an encyclopedic knowledge of the Faith, but he takes rigorous notes in all of his classes.

He never crosses a superior, but he takes frequent initiative and always stands up for what he thinks is right.

He visits his apostolate more than he is required, prays two holy hours per day, never misses class, and does all of his assigned reading. He is studying at least one extra foreign language, reading a classic work of literature, and cultivating a hobby. He is frequently recreating with the other men, does overtime on his house job, and is always free to drive the rector somewhere.

His formation priorities are perfect: spiritual above intellectual, intellectual above human, human above pastoral, and pastoral above spiritual.

He has perfect Latin and loves the liturgy, but he is not “too traditional.”

He knows secular and ecclesial politics inside and out but has no opinion on any of it.

He is a connoisseur of fine wine and spirits, but he never drinks.

He never wears clerics when others are not, and he always wears them when others are.

He had an extremely successful career in the world, had a healthy and steady relationship with a beautiful woman, hit “rock bottom” in some way or another, recovered, and gave it all up to go to seminary. And he is only 25.

He follows the rules of the house perfectly and gently calls others to account, but he is not rigid.

He is handsome, manly, and sociable around women, but he is never hit on and is never flirtatious.

He is always nicely dressed, his car always works, he never asks the diocese for money, but he is just a poor seminarian who lives a life of simplicity.

His parents taught him everything he knows about being a Christian. So did his parish priest. So has the formation program.

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